Alarming footage shows how global warming is rapidly melting Iceland's glaciers

The time lapse, recorded by Dr. Kieran Baxter, lecturer at the University of Dundee, shows the melting of the Breiðamerkurjökull glacier in Vatnajökull National Park in Iceland

A shocking time-lapse reveals the damage caused by global warming to Iceland’s glaciers (

Image: Dr. Kieran Baxter / SWNS)

An incredible time lapse filmed over 6 weeks revealed the terrible truths of global warming with the melting of Icelandic glaciers.

The footage confirms experts’ fears about the rapid change in Earth’s climate due to human activity, with ice melting occurring more during the winter season than just the summer.

The time lapse, recorded by Dr. Kieran Baxter, lecturer in communication design at the Duncan of Jordanstone College of Art & Design at the University of Dundee, showed the melting of the Breiðamerkurjökull glacier in Vatnajökull National Park in the southeast of the country.

Dr. Baxter, with the help of colleagues at the University of Iceland Research Center, had taken the footage to show the alarming rate at which centuries-old glaciers are melting.

Dr. Kieran Baxter had held the glacier melt for a period of 6 weeks
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Image:

Dr. Kieran Baxter / SWNS)

Dr. Baxter said, “Footage like this should be a wake up call that we can no longer ignore the signs.

“Climate change is already having dire consequences worldwide and we have to take responsibility for this.

Unfortunately, one of the largest ice caps in Europe, Vatnajökull, has been melting since 1989, according to the Icelandic Meteorological Office, losing 150-200 km of ice and reducing its area by more than 400 km.

The Vatnajökull ice cap has lost 150-200 km of ice since 1989
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Image:

Dr. Kieran Baxter / SWNS)

Unfortunately, this isn’t the first time Dr. Baxter captures the melting of glaciers with aerial photographs of the disappearance of the largest glaciers in Iceland and the loss of ice around Mont Blanc in the French and Italian Alps.

South East Iceland Nature Research Center glaciologist Sn varr Gu mundsson said that the destruction of the glaciers has taken all chances of recovery with over 250 meters of ice lost every year.

Dr. Baxter always shots like this one should be a wake up call so as not to ignore climate change.
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Image:

Dr. Kieran Baxter / SWNS)

Dr. Orvar ur rnason, who leads the collaborative project at the University of Iceland, said: “Where our previous coproduction After Ice included a recreation of Iceland’s recent past of glacier melt, the new project looks to the future – or rather a number of potential future prospects that depend on measures to reduce greenhouse gas emissions today.

“This project is a close collaboration between artists and scientists in Scotland and Iceland.

“We have found that this interdisciplinary work is crucial for successful climate communication.”

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