Cops seize UK's biggest haul of MDMA and meth stuffed inside kids' toys

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Cops seize UK's biggest haul of MDMA and meth stuffed inside kids' toys

A man has pleaded guilty to a number of drug charges after large quantities of MDMA was found hidden in children’s toys.

The Metropolitan Police said Patrick Scotland, 28, of White City, west London, pleaded guilty to several drug charges at Isleworth Crown Court, where he is to be sentenced on Friday.

Officers believe the haul of Class A and B drugs with a £2.3 million estimated street value that has been linked to Scotland is the largest seizure of MDMA and crystal meth from a residential address in the UK.

Scotland pleaded guilty to three counts of possession with intent to supply a Class A drug (MDMA, LSD, Methylamphetamine) and two charges of possession with intent to supply a Class B drug (Ketamine, Cannabis Resin), according to a police spokesman.

He has also admitted being concerned in the fraudulent evasion of a prohibition on the importation of a class A drug, and also to the possession of a weapon for the discharge of a noxious liquid/gas/electrical incapacitation device.

Border Force officers were carrying out routine checks on postal items entering the UK when they found MDMA hidden in children’s toys in packages that were addressed to Scotland.

Police were alerted by council staff who discovered a large quantity of suspected Class A drugs at Scotland’s address when they were carrying out routine gas safety checks on February 12.

Sealed bags and Tupperware tubs containing various types of pills and powders – including several kilos of crystal meth, MDMA and cocaine, 185,000 ecstasy pills, eight kilos of cannabis resin and over 10,000 LSD tabs, along with drug paraphernalia – were found at the property.

Officers from the Met’s Central West Command Unit, who arrested Scotland, later recovered drugs which were hidden under a sofa, along with a laptop.

Police also believe it is first seizure of its kind in helping dismantle a dark web drugs site in the UK, as items that were advertised online were the same as those found at Scotland’s address.

Unique motifs stamped on the pills linked them back to Scotland.

Detective Sergeant Kieran Curry, of the Central West Gangs Unit, said: “This is a fantastic example of a collaborative effort to crack down on drug-related criminality, which ultimately enabled us to remove a vast amount of Class A and B drugs from the streets of London.”

He added: “The evidence we built against Scotland was overwhelmingly strong and ultimately led to a guilty plea. It is a sterling example of the work that goes on behind the scenes to ensure such offenders are brought to justice.

“We take a zero-tolerance approach to drug dealing and the associated violence that comes with it.

“The Met will continue to proactively target those involved in this kind of activity, with the aim of removing such individuals from our streets and systematically disrupting the supply of drugs in our local communities.”

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