COVID-19 temporarily reduces male fertility: study

COVID-19 temporarily reduces male fertility by 18 percent while getting vaccinated against the virus has no negative effect on conception, according to a new study cited Wednesday by Dr. Anthony Fauci.

“The data are clear: COVID-19 vaccination in male or female partners did not affect the likelihood of conception,” the White House Chief Medical Advisor said at a press conference, citing a study published this week in the American Journal Epidemiology.

Researchers examined 2,126 women in the US and Canada between December 2020 and September 2021 — before and after they got vaccinated — and found the jabs had no impact on babymaking.

But couples were temporarily 18 percent less likely to conceive if the male partner had been infected with [COVID] within 60 days of trying, according to the study.

“COVID-19 disease temporarily reduced male fertility,” Fauci said.

The study found that couples were temporarily 18 percent less likely to conceive if the male partner had been with COVID-19 within 60 days of trying.
AP
Fauci also dispelled rumors that the COVID-19 makes it more difficult for women to conceive.
Getty Images

A separate study, published last week in the journal Obstetrics & Gynecology, found that COVID-19 vaccination also had no impact on “ovarian stimulation” success in women doing IVF.

Fauci said he presented the studies to combat misinformation, largely circulating online, that falsely states the mRNA jabs make it harder to get pregnant.

A study published in June also found that men who received the Pfizer or Moderna COVID-19 vaccine did not see a drop in sperm count or quality.

Leave a Comment