Home World News Maine’s Independent-Minded Voters Want Susan Collins to Stand Up to Her Party

Maine’s Independent-Minded Voters Want Susan Collins to Stand Up to Her Party

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Maine’s Independent-Minded Voters Want Susan Collins to Stand Up to Her Party

It is the emergence of political calculations that really outrages Les Fossel, a lifelong Republican who lives in Knox County, part of the state’s largely blue 1st Congressional District. He served in state law for six years and served as chairman of the Collins election campaign in Knox County for all of their elections.

When the state GOP asked him to serve again this year, he declined. Collins had been on a slippery partisan slide far too long for him. First there was the Kavanaugh confirmation. Then there was Collins’ unwillingness to admit evidence in Trump’s impeachment proceedings and her subsequent vote against either of the impeachment articles. More recently, it was the discovery that US intelligence agencies had warned of the severity of the pandemic back in January (Collins is a member of the Intelligence Committee that received at least some of this information).

“It was their responsibility to stand against Trump or get out,” he said. “Instead, she just hid and let him run rough.”

The current position at the Supreme Court is the last straw.

“If I were to represent a constituency, I would be honored not to vote until we know for sure whether the election will give control of the presidency and the Senate to the Democrats. This nomination process must follow the election results. “

Ginsburg’s vacancy could have others unexpected consequences for Collins’ race.

Maine is the only state that uses a ranked election, which works like an instant runoff when no candidate gets more than 50 percent of the vote. The new Colby poll shows Gideon 4-point ahead of Collins. (A poll last week by Suffolk University and the Boston Globe revealed similar numbers.) Two independent candidates currently hold 8 percent of the vote and 6 percent of the electorate undecided, increasing the possibility that neither Collins nor Gideon would get a majority and that second-choice ballots would come into play.

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