UK Christmas turkey shortage is likely and other farm facilities are being mothballed, MPs warned

It is likely that there will be a shortage of UK-produced turkeys by Christmas – and farm facilities for other produce will be “mothballed” – MPs have been warned.

Graeme Dear, chairman of the British Poultry Council, told MPs there was a “chance” that there would be a shortage of UK-made turkeys at Christmas and warned that products would have to be imported from Europe.

He said, “We have been granted access for up to 5,500 through the seasonal worker program, but that ends on December 31st.

“We would have liked to have known that in June, so we could have put enough turkeys for a full Christmas party.

“We’re going to do our best to make sure Christmas is as normal as possible, but there is a likelihood of bottlenecks – if we had known in June or July that this would have been fixed.

“Around 90% of our bottlenecks are in the processing plants, and the irony is that for Christmas in the UK we may have to import turkey from France and Poland, probably with some of the workers we trained and left to return home. “

Farmers warned that equipment would be “mothballed” and huge amounts of products would be wasted due to labor shortages.

Tom Bradshaw, vice president of the National Farmers’ Union, told MPs on the Environment, Food and Rural Affairs Committee that nearly a quarter of this year’s daffodil harvest has been wasted because it could not be picked.

He added: “The food waste we see at the farm level, whether it’s zucchini, apples that are not picked, autumn raspberries that are not currently picked, or tragic culls in the pig sector, is completely inexcusable.

“It is in the gift of this government to come up with solutions that mean this will not happen next year, but it needs to be done urgently as the lack of confidence we have in several sectors is leading to investment plans being put in place . ”And many are mothballing systems.

“We have greenhouses to grow tomatoes that are currently being mothballed because they don’t know if they’ll have the manpower to pick them while energy bills are skyrocketing and making an impact.”

It comes in the midst of an ongoing shortage of around 100,000 truck drivers – and because rising energy costs have also increased the costs of food production and logistics.

The shortage of truck drivers has numerous repercussions and has created a backlog in British ports such as Felixstowe. Shipping containers could not be emptied and removed from port quickly enough to deposit new supplies.

Worldwide, the pandemic is making international supply chain logistics more difficult and is affecting food and toy imports.

The shortage of truck drivers has numerous repercussions and has created a backlog in British ports such as Felixstowe. Shipping containers could not be emptied and removed from port quickly enough to deposit new supplies.


You can find more stories from where you live at Near you.

.

Leave a Comment